We're hiring Spanish and German Translators

Either you have free time OR work doing translations. As far as I can see, this doesn't seem like a "proper" job. Hire full-time or make sure its part-time, inbetween is bad.
If help is needed as Community, I can give a hand with english-spanish.
I want to suggest not translate the common poe terms
like name of currency, skills, name of abilitys and name of items.

Its more than enough if you would translate lore and skills-descriptions.

For example look at Dota 2 where the translation has no impact in communication because Hero Names,Skills, Items are still in english.

In PoE you should trade with others and then you will communicate in english 99,9% of the time anyway. And if a newplayer only knew the "german names" of currency and skills it can be a problem imho.
Italian when *vibrates*
Too bad i already have a fulltime job here ( Germany ), would fit quite well with english communication skills managing software development related client relations in the IT company i work for, as well as native german language skills i´d judge to be above average ;)

But nvm, gl :P

By the way : PLEASE PLEASE remove / change this german translation "Gemme" for skill gems.

It hurt so much every time i read or hear it, almost unbearable pain ...
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SamothD wrote:

...and why would that be a problem? How often do you talk to your computer when playing PoE and need to be able to talk fast?

In your introduction, you criticised movie synchronisations for the changes to dialogue contents merely for the sake of remaining synchronous with the actors' lip movements. Now you suddenly cite the number of syllables as an argument where lip synching isn't even a factor?


I actually talk a lot while playing, mostly on TeamSpeak.
While the mouth movement and the lipsync are only examples for why the language can feel bad/unnatural, the syllables are not.
If a name is too long or too complicated, most of the time players will find new ways to name the item, giving them nicknames or acronyms. In english we have GCPs, while doing this for a few things can be nice, having to do it for all currency items and more is bad. It gives the language a bad feel to it. It vastly increases the amount you have to read, type and understand. Do you really think people will use "Immwerwährender Splitter des Ewigen Kaiserreiches" as a name? I don't think so, so why not name it something easy or closer to the original like "Zeitloser Splitter des Imperiums"

"
SamothD wrote:

"Edel Orb"? Dude, that's not even German. That's about as German as "Schnell Car" or "Köstlich Food"

Auch wenn die Bedeutung aus dem Englischen stammt, kann es trotzdem so übernommen werden, deswegen heißt es ja auch "Fast Food" in Deutschland und nicht "Schnelle Lebensmittel"





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SamothD wrote:

Another user was already kind enough to point you towards the meaning of "Gemme".


Yeah I can google, too. I asked some friends and family, no one has ever heard of that word or knew the meaning without googling.
https://www.dict.cc/?s=gem

They literally used the least common translation.

Nobody even heard of that.

You also have to mind where the reader is coming from when translating.

Why not use the most common translation or the most fitting?

No, use a fringe translation that nobody ever heard of.
Tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis
Would a student studying/planning to study Germanistic be okay? Not a native by means
Would a student studying/planning to study Germanistic be okay? Not a native by means
The problem is, at least in the german translation, the previous translators did such an horrible job that you would potentially need to rewrite the whole translation to make it useful.

Some stuff is just literally translated without the thought of making it useful and some stuff is just google translator gibberish that doesn't even make sense.
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"
Tomberry wrote:
I actually talk a lot while playing, mostly on TeamSpeak.
...
If a name is too long or too complicated, most of the time players will find new ways to name the item, giving them nicknames or acronyms. In english we have GCPs, while doing this for a few things can be nice, having to do it for all currency items and more is bad. It gives the language a bad feel to it. It vastly increases the amount you have to read, type and understand.

Fair enough, talking on TS and possibly negotiating with others is a problem. That's a good point.

I guess if the German-speaking community (and by that I mean the community that plays PoE in German, too) was bigger and had been established for a longer time, we'd long since have abbreviations or acronyms for the most common items, though.

For example, the English-speaking world doesn't trade in "Orbs of Fusing", either - they trade in "fuses". Which is kinda funny actually because "fuse" literally means "Sicherung". :D

I guess you'd end up using similar short forms in German. You might end up saying stuff like "Der Typ wollte 5 Erhabene für den Schrott! Ich habe ihm 3 Chaos geboten, und das war noch viel".

"
Tomberry wrote:
Do you really think people will use "Immwerwährender Splitter des Ewigen Kaiserreiches" as a name? I don't think so, so why not name it something easy or closer to the original like "Zeitloser Splitter des Imperiums"

Nope, I fully agree no one will use the long form in spoken conversations. Now, since I don't play league content, I don't know how common that item is and how often you'd actually refer to it at all.

The problem is it's not just any old empire, but the Eternal Empire. Translating it simply as "Imperium" does leave out something. As for the "immerwährend" vs. "zeitlos", maybe they needed to reserve the shorter word for something else?

The English game is full of synonyms, and that's a problem. You often have three or four adjectives that actually mean pretty much the same, but you need to differentiate because they do not represent the same item or property. This means that the solution will sometimes sound a bit forced. Maybe this was the case here, I don't know.

In any case, I can totally see mammoth compounds like "Splitter des Ewigen Kaiserreiches" becoming shortened to slang forms like "Kaisersplitter" or something - sounds stupid at first, but I could imaging that words like "exalted shard" sound pretty goofy for a native speaker as well. We just don't feel the awkwardness because it's not our native tongue.


"
Tomberry wrote:

Auch wenn die Bedeutung aus dem Englischen stammt, kann es trotzdem so übernommen werden, deswegen heißt es ja auch "Fast Food" in Deutschland und nicht "Schnelle Lebensmittel"

Of course - technically that's always a possibility. In general this is mostly done in either of the two following situations:

- the development is so fast that the English term is adopted before a German term can be invented and established - e.g. "laptop". Much later, some entity suggested "Klapprechner", IIRC. Of course, everyone rejected that and said it's ridiculous. Everyone felt so cool saying "laptop" and everyone was used to it. Anything new was bound to feel awkward. But if you look at it, "laptop" is actually kinda stupid. "Schoßaufsatz" is more or less what it literally translates to. Doesn't tell anything about the object in question. "Klapprechner" would be much closer. It's a "Rechner" (computer - that's what computer literally means, after all!), and you can fold it unlike a regular PC. Still, it was too late.

- there is an entire concept behind the word. This would be the case with "fast food". It's stuff that's fast to make, can be eaten rather fast and is mostly served in special, dedicated fast food restaurants that do not even try to be cozy and welcoming. It's not just the food itself, it's an entire 'eating culture', if you will. Home-cooked pasta with tomato sauce or a self-made slice of bread with ham or cheese is also fast, but we wouldn't really call it fast food.

Back to topic - still, yes, it would be possible to introduce "orb" as a purely fantasy word into German. I'm personally reluctant about that because I am allergic to the careless "Denglisch" that I see so often. Not saying that your "orb" suggestion in itself would be so horrible - I just want to point out why I'm generally against taking over English words unless I'm convinced it's really necessary.


"
Tomberry wrote:
I asked some friends and family, no one has ever heard of that word or knew the meaning without googling.

Okay, that's interesting. Maybe a generation thing, too? Most people around me do know that word and roughly know that it means something with gems/jewellery. Then again, I'm an old fart, I've played my share of pen & paper RPGs (you learn many old-fashioned words this way, such as "Zierat", "Geschmeide" or "Pretiosen"), and many people I know are also nerds to varying degrees. :D

Well, excuse the long post, but this has been quite an interesting exchange so far. I tend to get carried away a bit in such situations.

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